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Winter Weather Whodunit

There is something about mystery/crime fiction that goes well with the winter season. If you crave the gritty, atmospheric, and claustrophobic feeling that this book genre offers, here is a list of recently published books that you can borrow from the library now.

There is something about mystery/crime fiction that goes well with the winter season. If you crave the gritty, atmospheric, and claustrophobic feeling that this book genre offers, here is a list of recently published books that you can borrow from the library now.

The Butterfly Girl by Rene Denfeld

In Denfeld’s second novel, Naomi Cottle returns and focuses her attention on a case close to her. Naomi wants to find her missing sister, whom she left behind when she fled captivity as a child. But how would Naomi solve the mystery if she cannot remember the time before or during her captivity? While in Portland, Oregon, figuring out the mystery of her missing sister, Naomi learns that missing girls are ending up dead. The story explores how people deal with traumatic experiences. This mystery is for those who enjoy fast-paced and compelling stories in the style of Harlan Coben’s Runaway and Lisa Gardner’s Love You.

Heaven, my Home by Attica Locke

Nine-year old Levi King has disappeared. His family has ties to the Aryan Brotherhood. His father, Bill “Big Kill” King, is known for killing a black man but never being convicted for it. Levi was last seen on Caddo Lake in Jefferson, a community steeped in antebellum history. When African American Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is sent to investigate, his initial suspicions are confirmed that there is more to the child’s disappearance than familial problems. Attica Locke’s second novel does not disappoint. It is a well-written and compelling crime novel that explores the mindset and culture of a small-town community in the Southwest. If you enjoy crime stories by Walter Mosley, Greg Iles, and Thomas Mullen, you will enjoy Attica Locke’s Heaven, My Home.

Gallow’s Court by Martin Edwards

Set in London in 1930, Rachel Savernake, a 24-year old heiress turns her interest to sleuthing. When she beats Scotland Yard in solving a recent murder, Rachel attracts the interest of both police inspectors and Fleet Street reporters, specifically one by the name of Jacob Flint, who has started looking into the case a bit more. Jacob slowly finds that Rachel has something to hide. This atmospheric mystery is intricately plotted with suspense that will keep readers turning the page. If you like Rhys Bowen and Agatha Christie, you will enjoy Martin Edwards’ latest novel.

The Chestnut Man by Soren Sveistrup

The Chestnut Man is Soren Sveistrup’s (creator and writer of the Danish TV Series The Killing) first foray into writing novels. He covers all the bases about what makes a great crime fiction story. Set in Copenhagen, a woman is found murdered with a small doll made of chestnut beside her. Newly paired Detectives Naia Thulin and Mark Hess are asked to investigate the case. When they find a fingerprint of a missing girl on the chestnut doll, both Detectives Thulin and Hess know that they have serial killer on the loose. With unexpected plots and twists, Sveistrup leaves his readers with bated breath as we follow the unlikely heroes as they race to catch the killer known as the “Chestnut Man”.

The Truth Behind the Lie by Sara Lovestam

Swedish children’s and young adult author, Sara Lovestam’s debut mystery novel first appeared in 2015 and won both the Swedish Crime Writers’ Academy Award and the Grand Prix de Litterature Policiere. The story revolves around two characters who live on the fringe of society. Kouplan, an undocumented Iranian refugee, is struggling to survive in Stockholm, Sweden. He decides to place an ad online claiming that he is a private investigator, even though he has neither credentials nor any prior experience. When Pernilla’s six-year-old daughter goes missing, she sees the ad online and decides to hire Kouplan. Despite his fears of the police and deportation, Kouplan diligently investigates the missing person’s case. Lovestam’s novel slowly builds and readers will find themselves invested in its two fully-realized characters, Kouplan and Pernilla.

Bad Axe County by John Galligan

In 2004, Heidi White has just given a speech as the Wisconsin Dairy Queen when she learns that her parents have been shot on their farm. The police concludes that it was a murder-suicide, but Heidi believes that is not the case. Fifteen years later, Heidi finds herself the first female sheriff of Bad Axe County, Wisconsin. Still known as the Dairy Queen, she not only struggles with endless crimes in the town but also with sexism. Upon hearing that the old sheriff of Bad Axe County is dead, Angus Beavers, a long-time native who used to be known as the local baseball star, returns home and pursues a cold murder case. Slowly, John Galligan brings the stories of these characters together in a mystery that involves misogyny, human trafficking, child abuse, and murder. A portrait of the midwest that’s never seen before, Galligan’s Bad Axe County is all you could ask for in atmospheric noir fiction.