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100th Anniversary of the 19th Ammendment

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which gives women the right to vote. Here’s a list of books you can borrow to explore the history of women’s suffrage.
We also encourage everyone to exercise their right to vote.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which gives women the right to vote. Here’s a list of books you can borrow to explore the history of women’s suffrage.
We also encourage everyone to exercise their right to vote.

Voting Down the Rose: Florence Brooks Whitehouse and Maine’s Fight for Women Suffrage
by Anne B. Gass

Voting Down the Rose is a lively account of Maine native Florence Brooks Whitehouse’s efforts to win women voting rights in the decisive final years of the campaign, 1914-1920. Considered radical for picketing the White House, Florence helped win women suffrage against a backdrop of conservative views of women’s roles, political intrigues, WWI, and the 1918 influenza epidemic (Publisher).

The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote
by Elaine Weiss

Weiss (Fruits of Victory) chronicles the  crucial and contentious struggle to make Tennessee the  final state to ratify the  19th Amendment during the  sweltering summer of 1920. She traces the  history of the  suffrage movement, and profiles the  principle players. Social, political, regional, economic, and racial factors complicated the  fight. Suffragists were disunited; Carrie Catt (protégé of Susan B. Anthony) created the  National American Women  Suffrage Association, which warred with Alice Paul and Sue White’s radical National Woman’s  Party. Tennesseans and other Southerners used trickery to prevent the  imposition of yet another national amendment to invite federal election oversight and threaten white supremacy. Corporate interests believed female voters would threaten their corrupt stronghold over state government. President Woodrow Wilson courted women’s  votes to gain support for the  League of Nations, and waffling presidential candidates used the  suffrage issue to suit their advantage. VERDICT This well-researched and well-documented history reveals how prosuffragists sometimes compromised racial equality to win white women’s  enfranchisement, and that, although the  19th Amendment was ratified, there exists to this day an ongoing battle to effect universal, unrestricted suffrage. Essential for all libraries and readers interested in this vital issue. [See “Editors’ Spring Picks,” p. 29.] –Margaret Kappanadze (Reviewed 02/01/2018) (Library Journal, vol 143, issue 2, p113)

The Secret History of Wonder Woman
by Jill Lepore

New Yorker writer Lepore (David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of History , Harvard Univ.) presents an engaging, well-researched look at the  unconventional family behind the  character and stories of Wonder Woman . The  author focuses on the  character’s creator, William Moulton Marston, and his family: Elizabeth Holloway Marston, his wife and partial inspiration for the  character; Olive Byrne, who lived with the  couple in a polyamorous relationship; and Margaret Huntley, who also lived with the  family on and off through the  years. Also featured are the  family’s four children: two with Holloway Marston and two with Byrne. Marston was a psychologist, one of the  originators of the  modern lie detector, and a fervent propagandist of  female sexual power, if not necessarily female emancipation. Lepore handles her potentially thorny topic well and manages to avoid being salacious or gossipy. Readers looking for an exploration of Wonder Woman  herself would do better to try Tim Hanley’s Wonder Woman  Unbound . Lepore uses the  character more as a touchstone to guide her exploration of the  Marston family. VERDICT Fans interested in the  background of the  character and readers who appreciate well-written popular history  will enjoy this thought-provoking volume. [See Prepub Alert, 4/21/14.]— Hanna Clutterbuck, Harvard Univ. Lib., Cambridge, MA –Hanna Clutterbuck (Reviewed September 15, 2014) (Library Journal, vol 139, issue 15, p96)

All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation
by Rebecca Traister

As Beyoncé sang, “Now put your hands up!” Today, only 20 percent of  adults under the  age of  29 are married, compared with nearly 60 percent in 1960, a dramatic shift in which unmarried women  played a major role. In this compelling narrative, Traister (Big Girls Don’t Cry: The  Election That Changed Everything) investigates how scores of single women  have contributed to important social and  political movements that have changed U.S. history—before and  after Betty Friedan and  Gloria Steinem. A thoughtful journalist, Traister explores the  history of the  “spinster” and  explains how issues such as class, race, sexuality, and  religion have impacted single women  throughout time, and  how they in return have influenced the  workplace, personal space, and the  concept of  family. In addition to her painstaking research, Traister includes stories from the  unattached ladies  themselves in more than 100 interviews and  draws on pop culture references such as Sex & the  City and  Bridesmaids. While the  image of the  free, independent woman  is considered a modern sensation, Traister reveals that she has always fought for the  right to own her self-identity as well as for the  rights of  others. VERDICT This fast-paced, fascinating book will draw in fans of  feminism, social sciences, and  U.S. history, similar to Gail Collins’s When Everything Changed. [See Prepub Alert, 9/28/15.] –Venessa Hughes (Reviewed 02/15/2016) (Library Journal, vol 141, issue 3, p121)

A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women’s Rights
by Kate Hannigan

Hannigan presents an invigorating account of the life of Belva Lockwood, taking readers from her childhood in Niagara County, N.Y., to her career as one of the first women lawyers in the U.S. to her 1884 run for president (“Are women not worth the same as men? Belva spent her whole life asking that question.”). Working in her distinctively crackled folk style, Jay depicts powerful moments of resistance and courage from Lockwood’s life—whether storming into a classroom or protesting before the Supreme Court. Endnotes provide a timeline of Lockwood’s life and beyond, highlighting significant events in the ongoing fight for women’s rights and concluding with Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential run. Ages 9–12. Author’s agent: Jennifer Mattson, Andrea Brown Literary. Illustrator’s agent: Lorraine Owen, the Organisation. (Jan.) –Staff (Reviewed 11/20/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 47, p)

Around America to Win the Vote: Two Suffragist, a Kitten, and 10,000 Miles
by Mara Rockliff

A car made up of bright primary colors—yellow hood, blue doors, and red luggage compartment—transports suffragists Nell Richardson and Alice Burke, a kitten, and readers across the United States all in the name of “Votes for Women!” Throughout, the pacing is excellent, and Rockliff begins the adventure with a litany of items found inside the petite yellow vehicle (“tools,/spare parts,/a teeny-tiny typewriter”) and introduces Richardson and Burke and emphasizes their determination to get the word out (“V. for W.!”). Readers will follow the two women (and their kitten) from New York City to Philadelphia, through a blizzard, a stop at an all-yellow luncheon, a stint in a circus parade, and more as they drive down South and along the U.S. and Mexican border all the way to California and back. Rockliff communicates the boundless energy of these two figures and adds touches of humor to lift the narrative; this small but significant historical moment is presented as accessible and fun without undermining the importance of Richardson, Burke, and the fight for women’s equality. Hooper shows the women working together (a concluding image of Richardson handing Burke a daffodil is wonderful), the curiosity and interest on the faces of passersby (mainly white folks), and the dress and style of the times. While this is an excellent introduction to the efforts of suffragists, when discussing this text and the Nineteenth Amendment, librarians may want to clarify that statements such as “At last, American women had won the right to vote” (mentioned in the back matter section titled “Winning the Vote”) did not always reflect the reality of African American women and other women of color, who often faced legal and illegal barriers to vote (especially in the South) until well into the 1960s. VERDICT Prepare for the arrival of the “little yellow car” into the hearts of readers; this charming and vibrant account of two lesser-known figures will bolster historical collections.—Della Farrell, School Library Journal –Della Farrell (Reviewed 07/01/2016) (School Library Journal, vol 62, issue 7, p95)

A Time for Courage: The Suffragette Diary of Kathleen Bowen
by Kathryn Lasky

Kat Bowen records her days in Washington, DC, in a diary from her mother. A typical 13-year-old from a well-to-do family, she expresses her dreams and hopes as she recounts her thoughts on school, homework, relationships, parties, and her special bond with her cousin Alma. As the early days of 1917 pass, Kat becomes increasingly aware of the political issues that are prevalent, particularly the inevitable involvement of the U.S. in World War I and women’s suffrage. Her physician father is quietly supportive of his wife’s activism in the movement, while his brother-in-law, Alma’s father, demeans it and forbids the women in his family to participate in any way. Kat soon joins her mother sewing banners and bringing hot bricks for warmth on the picket line. Lasky entwines some of the real characters of the day with her fictional figures. She gives a good overview of the harsh treatment these women endured during their picketing and imprisonment and touches on divorce, the plight of African-American citizens in the South, and President Wilson’s disinterest in rights for women. Kat is well developed into a young woman whose exposure to the politics and consequences allow her to mature and decide what true liberty and justice for all really means. A historical note and reproductions of photos are appended.–Rita Soltan, Baldwin Public Library, Birmingham, MI –Rita Soltan (Reviewed August 1, 2002) (School Library Journal, vol 48, issue 8, p190)

The Firefly Letters: A Suffragette’s Journey to Cuba
by Margarita Engle

This engaging title documents 50-year-old Swedish suffragette and novelist Fredrika Bremer’s three-month travels around Cuba in 1851. Based in the  home of a wealthy sugar planter, Bremer journeys around the  country with her host’s teenaged slave Cecilia, who longs for her mother and home in the  Congo. Elena, the  planter’s privileged 12-year-old daughter, begins to accompany them on their trips into the  countryside. Both Elena and Cecilia are inspired by their guest’s independence, Elena to wonder if she can avoid eventual marriage and Cecilia to dream of freedom for her unborn child. Using elegant free verse and alternating among each character’s point of view, Engle offers powerful glimpses into Cuban life at that time. Along the  way, she comments on slavery, the  rights of women, and the  stark contrast between Cuba’s rich and poor. The  author takes some license with the  real Bremer’s journey; Elena is fictional, which the  author is careful to point out in her author’s note. She also includes a reference list for readers who want to learn more about Bremer. The  easily digestible, poetic narrative makes this a perfect choice for reluctant readers, students of the  women’s movement, those interested in Cuba, and teens with biography assignments.—Leah J. Sparks, formerly at Bowie Public Library, MD –Leah J. Sparks (Reviewed February 1, 2010) (School Library Journal, vol 56, issue 2, p129)