Category Archives: Walker’s Bookshelf

Pride Month

Pride Month

This June marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York City, a turning point for the LGBTQ movement in the United States that has led to June’s designation as Pride month in an evolving form of celebration and reflection. On June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a New York bar populated by gay patrons. The

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Book of the Day: The Dry

Book of the Day: The Dry

When I feel like reading an atmospheric and gritty crime fiction novel, my mind takes me to the cold and snowy landscape that is Scandinavian or Nordic noir. Jane Harper’s gripping debut novel, The Dry, shows that the heat of the Australian outback is as good place as any for a good mystery story. Set in a parched climate of

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5 Questions with Eleanor Phillips Brackbill

5 Questions with Eleanor Phillips Brackbill

Eleanor Phillips Brackbill has a true love for history. She earned her M.A. in art history at Boston University and studied in the art history doctoral program at City University of New York. For twenty-five years, she served as the director of education at the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York. Afterwards, she embarked on

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Book of the Day: A Woman Is No Man

Book of the Day: A Woman Is No Man

Etaf Rum’s debut novel A Woman Is No Man interweaves the narratives of three women from a Palestinian family: Fareeda, her daughter-in-law Isra, and Isra’s daughter, Deya. Spanning from 1970 to 2008 and from Palestine to Brooklyn, the novel confronts the suffocating expectations and violence inflicted upon the women in this culture and questions whether actions and attitudes have or can change. Throughout

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BOOK OF THE DAY: Pachinko

BOOK OF THE DAY: Pachinko

“History has failed us, but no matter” is the opening line of Min Jin Lee’s novel Pachinko. This sweeping, historical, and immersive family saga delves deeply into the experiences of Korean immigrants in Japan between 1910 and 1989. The story begins in a small fishing village in Yeongdo, Korea. There, we are introduced to fishermen, farmers, and vendors who make up

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Children’s Books of the Day

Children’s Books of the Day

MS. KARA’S PICK: Just Like Rube Goldberg by Sarah Aronson Have you heard of a Rube Goldberg machine?  It’s what you call a series of chain reactions that achieves a final task.  Many times you make one using  whatever you have lying around the house.  Well, Rube Goldberg was a real person who lived a long time ago.  His parents

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Three Picks for Children’s Book Week

Three Picks for Children’s Book Week

One of the greatest delights of picture books is just how wide-ranging they can be. Whether it’s the intersection of word and image, the rhythm of language, the information conveyed, or the emotional terrain covered, there are endless reasons to celebrate these ever-inventive books.  Celebrate Children’s Book Week by opening a gem that makes you laugh, makes you cry, teaches

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Reading Janisse Ray on Earth Day

Reading Janisse Ray on Earth Day

“I carry the landscape inside me like an ache. The story of who I am cannot be severed from the story of the flatwoods.” This declaration of solidarity with the longleaf pine forests in the South sets the tone for Janisse Ray’s two-part memoir, Ecology of a Cracker Childhood and Wild Card Quilt. Ray grew up in intertwined worlds: home in a small Georgia town where her days

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Poem in Your Pocket

Poem in Your Pocket

Poem in Your Pocket Day is part of National Poetry Month. It is a day when people celebrate the beauty of poetry by selecting a poem, carrying it in their pocket, and sharing it with others. We have decided to extend this one-day celebration through the entire month of April. We encourage everyone to stop by the library and take

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Book of the Day: Sing To It by Amy Hempel

Book of the Day: Sing To It by Amy Hempel

Amy Hempel gained a reputation in the 1990s and early 2000s as a minimalist short story writer, saying as much with what she omits as what she includes. Perhaps it’s fitting, then, that she left readers a thirteen-year gap between books before publishing her new collection, Sing To It, in March. The book contains fourteen short pieces and one lengthier narrative, carrying the reader through a

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