Category Archives: Walker’s Bookshelf

Celebrate Black History Month

Celebrate Black History Month

In 1915, historian Carter G. Woodson and minister Jesse E. Moorland founded an organization dedicated to studying and promoting achievements made by African Americans called African American Life and History (ASALH). In 1926, the group started a national event, Negro History Week, choosing the month of February to coincide with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. Negro History

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Travel the World with Walker: Washington Black

Travel the World with Walker: Washington Black

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan (2018) begins in 1830 Barbados where the title character, George Washington (Wash) Black, is an eleven year old field slave. Within the first few pages, he is given to his cruel master’s visiting brother (Titch) to become  his manservant. At first terrified at what might become of him, Wash’s  life takes a surprising turn when his

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Celebrating the Work of Mary Oliver

Celebrating the Work of Mary Oliver

“I thought the earth / Remembered me, she / took me back so tenderly” writes Mary Oliver in “Sleeping in the Forest,” the opening poem of 1972’s collection Twelve Moons. Is there any poet whose comfort and belonging in the land has more clearly been attested since Whitman himself? The prolific writer, well known for her poetry and recently gaining

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Book of the Day: Among the Shadows

Book of the Day: Among the Shadows

This is the first of Coffin’s Detective Byron Series based in Portland and Westbrook, Maine. The story of serial cop murders is lent great credibility by Coffin’s 12 years of experience on the Portland police force as a Detective Sergeant. He knows the procedures, staff relationships, necessary mental clarity, laws, dangers, and emotions of one engaged in ethical law enforcement.

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Book of the Day: Station Eleven

Book of the Day: Station Eleven

In Station Eleven, author Emily St. John Mandel creates a convincing vision of humans struggling to survive after the collapse of modern life. The narrative moves back and forth between two eras, the pre-pandemic world of the 21st Century and the broken aftermath, twenty years later.  Arthur is a successful actor playing King Lear in Toronto. He dies on stage from

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Travel the World with Walker: A Boat Passage from Japan

Travel the World with Walker: A Boat Passage from Japan

If it’s possible to encapsulate a story within one sentence, Julie Otsuka’s 2011 novel The Buddha in the Attic rises to the challenge. The short volume borders on prose poetry as a collective voice tells the experience of Japanese mail order brides coming to America in the early 20th century. Strung together with the pronoun “we,” every sentence seems to

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Book of the Day: Winter by Karl Ove Knausgaard

Book of the Day: Winter by Karl Ove Knausgaard

Do the seasons have minds of their own? When winter unleashes snow, does it contemplate the transience of its most transformative action? Or are such complexities merely the imposition of the human mind as it observes the landscape’s seasonal changes? In Winter, Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard, best known for his multipart autobiographical My Struggle epic, deftly walks the thin

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WML Recommends

WML Recommends

Looking for a good book? Here’s what we recommend. Becky’s Pick : The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert A debut novel, I am in the middle of this YA page-turner and don’t want to put it down. The story hints at a dark fairy-tale world at the edge of our own world, and a young female protagonist who believes her mother was

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Implosion

Implosion

Search the Catalog Fascinating…disturbing…erudite…poetic…detailed…richly historical…painfully honest, and revealing all describe Garber’s memoir. I read her story with rapt attention as her brilliant, but often maniacal father, renown architect Woodie Garber relentlessly bent and enslaved his family to his will and whims. Woodie was a Modernist and adherent of the French architect Le Corbusier. His designs were flat roofed, nearly all

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