Tag Archives: book review

Losing Earth

Losing Earth

This short, well researched book is a powerful documentation of precious time lost to prevent climate change. The focus is on the years 1979-1989, a single decade that encompassed the Antarctic ozone hole crisis, and the tremendous flurry of scientific evidence and testimony about rising global temperatures that followed. It wasn’t just the scientific community raising the alarm. Oil, gas,

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Starred Review: We

Starred Review: We

Even though the term dystopian was first coined in the 1740s by historian George Claeys, dystopian fiction novels did not become fully defined until the turn of the twentieth century. Written in 1921, Yevgeny Zamyatin’s social satire We laid the foundations for the genre that is now ubiquitous: dystopian fiction. Zamyatin’s We imagines a future devoid of free-will and individuality. The ruler of OneState,

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The Adventure Zone: Murder on the Rockport Limited

The Adventure Zone: Murder on the Rockport Limited

This is the second book from the creators of The Adventure Zone roleplaying game podcast, the McElroys. The first one was set in a middle earth type environment and this one is now on a train (still with wizards and elves, but now there are trains involved). The first book was a hilarious send-up of D&D type games and this

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Starred Review: Implosion

Starred Review: Implosion

Fascinating…disturbing…erudite…poetic…detailed…richly historical…painfully honest, and revealing all describe Garber’s memoir. I read her story with rapt attention as her brilliant, but often maniacal father, renown architect Woodie Garber relentlessly bent and enslaved his family to his will and whims. Woodie Garber was a Modernist and adherent of the French architect Le Corbusier. His designs were flat roofed, and glass walled, making

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Starred Review: Diary of a Murderer

Starred Review: Diary of a Murderer

Kim Young-ha is an acclaimed writer in Korea. His works have been translated into English and other languages. Diary of a Murderer is a collection of four short stories ranging from suspenseful thrillers to ruminative explorations of human nature. The book opens with a thrilling titular story about a seventy-year old man, Kim Byeongsu, who is a former serial killer

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The Traveling Dustballs

The Traveling Dustballs

The Traveling Dustball is the second book in the BIG WORDS small stories series written by Judith Henderson and illustrated by T. L. McBeth. It is a graphic novel series of very short stories/chapters with one BIG WORD sprinkled in each tale. The Sprinkle Fairy likes to sprinkle big words around the book for kids to learn, so readers get

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Book of the Day: Disappearing Earth by Julia Phillips

Book of the Day: Disappearing Earth by Julia Phillips

“Without her girls, all she had was this breathlessness. Terrible as it was—and it was, it was—it was all she had left to mother.”  This is the loss upon which Julia Phillips’ breathtaking debut novel Disappearing Earth pivots: two young sisters on Russia’s Kamchatka peninsula go missing, and while rumors of a kidnapping swirl, their mother Marina faces a desolate horizon without

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Milkman

Milkman

Winner of the 2018 Man Booker Prize and 2019 National Book Critics Award for Fiction, Anna Burns’ Milkman follows the story of an eighteen-year old unnamed narrator, exploring what her life is like in a community living under oppression and divided by conflict. Even though Anna Burns did not specify where and when the novel is set, one could easily surmise that

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Spinning Silver

Spinning Silver

Set in Lithvas, a fictional country in Eastern Europe, Naomi Novik’s Spinning Silver follows the story of a moneylender’s daughter as she strives to survive in medieval England. Living in abject poverty, Miryem decides to take over her father’s failing money-lending business. She is quite successful at it that soon she attracts the attention of the Staryk king (the king

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Book of the Day: Station Eleven

Book of the Day: Station Eleven

In Station Eleven, author Emily St. John Mandel creates a convincing vision of humans struggling to survive after the collapse of modern life. The narrative moves back and forth between two eras, the pre-pandemic world of the 21st Century and the broken aftermath, twenty years later.  Arthur is a successful actor playing King Lear in Toronto. He dies on stage from

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